The Brief History of Burmese Muslim

History

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Early Immigrants

The first Muslims arrived in Burma’s Ayeyarwady River delta, on the Tanintharyi coast and in Rakhine in the 9th century, prior to the establishment of the first Burmese empire in 1055 AD by King Anawrahta of Bagan.[3][4][5][6][7][8] These early Muslim settlements and the propagation of Islam were documented by Arab, Persian, European and Chinese travelers of the 9th century.[3][9] Burmese Muslims are the descendants of Muslim peoples who settled and intermarried with the local Burmese ethnic groups.[10][11] Muslims arrived in Burma as traders or settlers,[12] military personnel,[13] and prisoners of war,[13] refugees,[3] and as victims of slavery.[14] However, many early Muslims also held positions of status royal advisers, royal administrators, port authorities, mayors, and traditional medicine men.[15]

Persian Muslims arrived in northern Burma on the border with the Chinese region of Yunnan as recorded in the Chronicles of China in 860 AD.[3][16] Bermese Muslims were sometimes called Pathi,[17] a name believed to be derived from Persian. Many settlements in the southern region near present day Thailand were noted for the Muslim populations, with Muslims often outnumbered the local Burmese. In one record, Pathein was said to be populated with Pathis, [17] and was ruled by three Indian Muslim Kings in the 13th century.[18][19][20] Arab merchants also arrived in Martaban, Margue, and there were Arab settlements in the present Meik archipelago’s mid-western quarters.[21]

During the reign of the Bagan King, Narathihapate (1255-1286), in the first Sino-Burman war, Kublai Khan’s Muslim Tatars invaded the Pagan Kingdom and occupied the area up to Nga Saung Chan. In 1283, Colonel Nasruddin’s Turks occupied the area up to Bamaw (Kaungsin).[22] Turk people (Tarek) were called Mongol, Manchuria, Mahamaden or Panthays.[23

West Kyone Yoe Central Mosque

West Kone Yow Central M9osque, Mandalay.

The first Muslims had landed in Myanmar (Burma’s) Ayeyarwady River delta, Tanintharyi coast and Rakhine as seamen in ninth century, prior to the establishment of the first Myanmar (Burmese) empire in 1055 AD by King Anawrahta of Bagan or Pagan. [24][25][26][27] The dawn of the Muslim settlements and the propagation of Islam was widely documented by the Arab, Persian, European and Chinese travelers of Ninth century.[28][29] The current population of Myanmar Muslims are the descendants of Arabs, Persians, Turks, Moors, Indian-Muslims, sheikhs, Pakistanis, Pathans, Bengalis, Chinese Muslims and Malays who settled and intermarried with local Burmese and many ethnic Myanmar groups such as, Rakhine, Shan, Karen, Mon etc.[30][31]

Muslim diaspora

The population of the Muslims increased during the British rule of Burma because of new waves of Indian Muslim Immigration. [32] This sharply declined in the years following 1941 as a result of the Indo-Burman Immigration agreement,[33] and was officially stopped following Burma’s (Myanmar) independence on 4 January 1948.

Muslims arrived in Burma as travelers, adventurers, pioneers, sailors, traders,[34] Military Personals (voluntary and mercenary)[35], and a number of them as prisoners of wars.[36] Some were reported to have taken refuge from wars, Monsoon storms and weather, shipwreck [37] and for a number of other circumstances. Some are victims of forced slavery [38] but many of them are professionals and skilled personals such as advisors to the kings and at various ranks of administration whilst others are port-authorities and mayors and traditional medicine men.[39]

Pathi and Panthays

panthay mosque

Panthay Mosque Mandalay,

Persian Muslims traveled over land, in search of China, and arrived northern Burma at Yunnan (China) border. Their colonies were recorded in Chronicles of China in 860 AD.[40][41] Myanmar Muslims were sometimes called Pathi, and Chinese Muslims are called Panthay. [42] It is widely believed that those names derived from Persi (Persian). Bago Pegu), Dala, Thanlyin (Syriam), Taninthayi (Tenasserim), Mottama (Martaban), Myeik (Mergui) and Pathein (Bassein) were full of Burmese Muslim settlers and they outnumbered the local Burmese by many times. In one record, Pathein was said to be populated with Pathis. Perhaps Pathein comes from Pathi.[43] And coincidentally, Pathein is still famous for Pathein halawa, a traditional Myanmar Muslim food inherited from northern Indian Muslims. In Kawzar 583 (13th Century), Bassein or Pathein was known as Pathi town under the three Indian Muslim Kings. [44][45][46] Arab merchants arrived Martaban, Margue. Arab settlement in the present Meik’s mid-western quarters. [47]

Panthay

During Bagan King, Narathihapate, 1255-1286, in the first Sino Burman war, Kublaikhan’s Muslim Tatars attacked and occupied up to Nga Saung Chan. Mongols under Kublai Khan invaded the Pagan Kingdom. During this first Sino Burman war in 1283, Colonel Nasruddin’s Turks occupied up to Bamaw. (Kaungsin)[22] (Tarek) Turk were called, Mongol, Manchuria, Mahamaden or Panthays. [48] The Chinese General Mah Tu Tu managed the building of a mosque donated by the Yunnanese Muslim king, Sultan Sulaiman, in nineteen century in central Mandalay. The mosque is still maintained in a very good condition. Most of the Myanmar Chinese Muslims are staying around the mosque and it is well known as Panthay Mosque. That area is called Panthay Dan (Panthay Quarters)

keep reading(source wikepedia)

5 thoughts on “About Burmese Muslims (Myanmar Muslims)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s